Wednesday, 17 December 2014

Are earlobe tribal piercings a good idea?

In certain eastern and African cultures, the insertion of a large disc into the earlobe holds sociological or religious significance. It may indicate allegiance to or membership in a particular tribe, or indicate the person has successfully gone through a rite of passage. However, the practice of tribal earlobe piercing or stretching has become a popular form of body modification for Millennial generation men and women.

The process of piercing and expanding a hole in the earlobe to accommodate jewelry such as a “flesh tunnel,” a “barbell” or a “plug” is time consuming. The person undergoing the procedure can anticipate at least 8 weeks from the time of the initial piercing to the final fitting, with additional piercing procedures needed every two weeks. If the stretching process is rushed, it can result in the earlobe actually splitting in two. There are some hazards involved in tribal ear piercing that aren’t found in traditional ear piercing as well. One is the occurrence of what is known as a “blow-out.” This happens when too much pressure is placed on the piercing tool and skin from inside the hole is squeezed out. The result is a visible build-up of scar tissue.

Once the earlobe is stretched to 12 mm, the earlobe will not regain its original shape if the process is stopped. Unlike more traditional ear piercing, the hole created through stretching is permanent even if jewellery isn’t inserted.

Although this form of body modification has become more widely accepted, there still are several considerations that should be examined prior to getting this type of piercing.

In a 2008 Harris Poll, 32 percent of respondents answered that they considered people with extreme body modifications such as earlobe tribal piercing to be “more likely to engage in deviant behavior.” One specific incident involving the inside sales representative of a box company in Massachusetts found that customers perceived this woman to be “promiscuous” and “emotionally unstable” based solely on her body art. A study done by the International Journal of Hospitality Management in 2004 found that 87 percent of human resources managers and recruiters would decline hiring an interviewee based on visible body art or modifications. According to a recent story done by CBS News on earlobe tribal piercings, the British Royal Army forbids enlistees from having any ear piercings other those that hold stud-type earrings. Although many international firms don’t have explicit dress codes that forbid earlobe tribal piercing, the majority will decline to hire a job applicant if he or she has them. And under United States civil law, unless the piercing has religious significance, denying a job applicant a position based on visible piercing is not considered discriminatory. Unlike other forms of body art that can be discreetly covered by clothing, earlobe tribal piercings are quite visible and have a direct impact on one’s ability to obtain employment.

Further, as skin ages, it loses its elasticity and firmness. Combine the aging process with the exaggerated stretching the piercing produces and the ears become reminiscent of those of a Bassett hound. The teenager who looks “hip” with enlarged earlobes becomes the 40-year-old who looks ridiculous.Earlobes that have been stretched can be repaired through cosmetic surgery. This process involves anesthetizing the earlobe, cutting away the excess flesh and reconstructing the earlobe so that it appears normal. Under NHS regulations this is considered elective surgery, but an investment in this cosmetic procedure is an excellent investment if earlobe tribal piercings have become an impediment to career or social success. For information regarding earlobe reconstruction, contact Cosmetic Surgery Partners.


Guestpost

17 comments:

  1. I find the practice repugnant. I can't see why people living in modern culture would want to distort their body this way. Before she died, my step-grandmother's lobes had stretched down to her shoulders (almost) because of her wearing heavy clip-on earrings. These kids never think of what they'll look like when they're over 80.

    ReplyDelete
  2. I wouldn't do it but it is a personal choice and if someone fancy it... why not?

    ReplyDelete
  3. I don't like it personally, but each to their own I say - I have plenty of friends with them!

    ReplyDelete
  4. I'd never do it but I know plenty of people who've had it done - Was engaged to one of them in fact.

    I don't think it looks nice when someone decides to take them out an the hole doesn't shrink back down but I guess it depends on people's personal preference, Plenty wouldn't like my lip peircing but I love it and have had it for 11 years so these things aren't always the fads that many assume

    ReplyDelete
  5. I wouldn't do it but quite like the large circular earings when it's been done. I'm not keen on the large flappy hole when they're taken out though!

    ReplyDelete
  6. I would never have it done but know people that have. I'm not one for doing anything that you can't change easily. I've never owned an item of clothing I'd want to wear everyday for ever so I steer away from anything permanent.

    ReplyDelete
  7. It was painful and awful enough having a tiny hole made (which got infected) never mind all that.

    ReplyDelete
  8. I do not want to judge people, each to their own and I would hope that if my children choose to do something like this that people see the person within

    ReplyDelete
  9. It's nice to read comments on peoples opinions on stretched ears. I've had mine stretched for 10 years now and although I've also had lip piercings which I removed 8 years ago, my ear stretchers are something I have wanted to keep. They're only 10mm so when I remove them, for example I did when I went on holiday so I could go swimming and do sports without the fear of losing my precious plugs, they go back so small. I can see why people don't like them but I also see why some people do like them. I have never been told by my employers to remove them. I wear subtle black or silver so they just look like regular earrings apparently. One of the most annoying things people ask me is if I regret doing it. It is my body so I can do what I like with it, I don't see ear stretching as an extreme and could think of worse things such as scarification.

    Tamsyn-Elizabeth
    Peach Pow XO

    ReplyDelete
  10. I personally don't like them but each to their own

    ReplyDelete
  11. There was a really cool comercial about old people with tatoos and piercings, and I'm guessing that is how the future will look like. I suppose the young people will think that piercing or tatooing yourself is really lame then.

    ReplyDelete
  12. I think they look ok to a point (point being where they don't go back) the small plugs look quite nice, but then you can easily fake those anyway so perhaps that is just the best way anyway. x

    ReplyDelete
  13. My teenage son has one and I hate it but have made him promise not to go any bigger

    ReplyDelete
  14. I wouldn't ever want one that big. Just imagine the pain!

    ReplyDelete
  15. It's definitely not something that I would do, but I don't mind the small plugs on people. Anything too large looks a bit odd though, I reckon.

    ReplyDelete
  16. They're not for me but I don't have any problem with anyone else having them....although would prefer my children not to!!

    ReplyDelete
  17. I think it's sad if people are judged solely on the way they look. It's only one part of a person.

    ReplyDelete

Everything written here is done so by the blog owner and it may appear elsewhere.
All content and images © Beautyqueenuk unless otherwise stated. Blog design by Beautyqueenuk